Sunday, January 27, 2013

The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson by Jerome Charyn


Jerome Charyn, "one of the most important writers in American literature" (Michael Chabon), continues his exploration of American history through fiction with The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson, hailed by prize-winning literary historian Brenda Wineapple as a "breathtaking high-wire act of ventriloquism." Channeling the devilish rhythms and ghosts of a seemingly buried literary past, Charyn removes the mysterious veils that have long enshrouded Dickinson, revealing her passions, inner turmoil, and powerful sexuality. The novel, daringly written in first person, begins in the snow. It's 1848, and Emily is a student at Mount Holyoke, with its mournful headmistress and strict, strict rules. Inspired by her letters and poetry, Charyn goes on to capture the occasionally comic, always fevered, ultimately tragic story of her life-from defiant Holyoke seminarian to dying recluse







On December 10, 2011, Emily Dickinson's 181st birthday, Jerome Charyn, author of the novel "The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson", spoke at the Emily Dickinson Museum. His talk, "Emily Dickinson: Outlaw" began with this video illustrating Dickinson's reach into 21st Century culture.


video



Interview on Jerome Charyn on Emily Dickinson and his novel " The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson" 


video




Video: Poems


These are videos documented by the followers of Emily Dickinson.


Because I could not stop for Death 

video



There's been a death in the opposite house 

video



Some Keep the Sabbath Going to Church




video




The Bee is not afraid of me 


video





There's a certain Slant of Light 


video




The Life and Death of Emily Dickinson 



video





Quick tour at the Emily Dickinson Museum


Videos 

A visit to the Emily Dickinson Homestead & Museum in Amherst MA by mnolanporter


video




The Poet in her bedroom by eurvater



video





Visiting Emily DIckinson by Bill Dusty 


video




Emily Dickinson's Garden: The Poetry of Flowers. Director of Exhibitions and Seasonal Displays, Karen Daubmann takes you on a behind the scenes tour of the construction process.


The Making of Emily Dickinson's Garden -- The Poetry of Flowers part 1


video



The Making of Emily Dickinson's Garden -- The Poetry of Flowers part 2 


video

The Making of Emily Dickinson's Garden -- The Poetry of Flowers part 3 


   
video







Emily Dickinson Museum

The Emily Dickinson Museum includes The Homestead, where poet Emily Dickinson was born and lived most of her life, and The Evergreens, home of the poet’s brother and his family. The two houses share three acres of the original Dickinson property in the center of Amherst, Massachusetts.


The Museum

WELCOME TO THE EMILY DICKINSON MUSEUM: THE HOMESTEAD AND THE EVERGREENS! 

The Emily Dickinson Museum comprises two historic houses in the center of Amherst, Massachusetts associated with the poet Emily Dickinson and members of her family during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Homestead was the birthplace and home of the poet Emily Dickinson. The Evergreens, next door, was home to her brother Austin, his wife Susan, and their three children.
Emily Dickinson Museum logo
The Museum was created in 2003 when the two houses merged under the ownership of Amherst College. Its mission is to educate diverse audiences about Emily Dickinson’s life, family, creative work, times, and enduring relevance, and to preserve and interpret the Homestead and The Evergreens as historical resources for the benefit of scholars and the general public.
In just a few short years the Emily Dickinson Museum has established a vibrant presence and ambitious program for encouraging a broad appreciation for this remarkable poet's unparalleled work.  A few of the Museum's most noteworthy accomplishments include:

  • creating four distinctive tours that present the story of Emily Dickinson from a variety of engaging perspectives.
  • designing lively programs--from poetry marathons and an annual 19th-century children's circus to rock concerts, lectures and hands-on workshops--to attract a wide and diverse audience.
  • installing the Museum's first professionally-designed interpretive exhibit, "my Verse is alive," about the early publication of Dickinson's poetry.
  • establishing a national program of intensive professional development workshops for K-12 teachers.
  • completing a series of planning documents to guide long-term restoration of both historic houses and the grounds.
  • restoring the Homestead's exterior to its authentic Dickinson-era color scheme.
  • enhancing the mechanical systems, fire detection systems, and drainage systems to promote long-term safety and preservation of the historic houses and collection


History of the Emily Dickinson Museum

The Emily Dickinson Museum
THE MUSEUM WAS CREATED IN 2003 when the two houses merged under the ownership of Amherst College. The Museum is dedicated to educating diverse audiences about Emily Dickinson’s life, family, creative work, times, and enduring relevance, and to preserving and interpreting the Homestead and The Evergreens as historical resources for the benefit of scholars and the general public.The Homestead and The Evergreens, with such close ties in the nineteenth century, saw their paths diverge in the twentieth. The Homestead was sold in 1916 to another Amherst family and underwent some modernization. In 1965, in recognition of the poet’s growing stature, the Homestead was purchased by Amherst College and open to the public for tours. It also served as a faculty residence for many years.
Next door, The Evergreens, occupied by Dickinson family heirs until 1988, remained virtually unchanged for a hundred years. In 1991, The Evergreens passed to a private testamentary trust, the Martha Dickinson Bianchi Trust (named in honor of Emily Dickinson’s niece), which began developing the house as a museum.
Collaborations between the Homestead and The Evergreens began as the Martha Dickinson Bianchi Trust prepared to open Austin Dickinson’s house to the public in the late 1990s. The success of these joint efforts suggested that uniting as one museum would have great advantages for the public as well as for administration and governance of the sites. Together the houses tell a more complete story about the poet, her family, and the world in which she lived.
To that end, The Emily Dickinson Museum was created on July 1, 2003, when ownership of The Evergreens was transferred by the Martha Dickinson Bianchi Trust to Amherst College. The merger of the houses and the three acres on which they stand restored the parts of the property to the estate Dickinson herself had known and furthers the College's long-standing and complex associations with the Dickinson family and its stewardship of Emily Dickinson’s poetry and other manuscripts.

Photos at the museum 

The Homestead, built around 1813 for Emily Dickinson’s grandparents, was where Emily was born in 1830. Her family moved to another house in 1840, but moved back here in 1855. Emily and her sister, Lavinia, lived here for the rest of their lives.
The Homestead, built around 1813 for Emily Dickinson’s grandparents, was where Emily was born in 1830. Her family moved to another house in 1840, but moved back here in 1855. Emily and her sister, Lavinia, lived here for the rest of their lives

 Front yard of the museum.



The only authenticated image of Emily Dickinson, circa 1847.
The only authenticated image of Emily Dickinson, circa 1847


In Emily’s bedroom (upper left corner of the house) is the small table at which she wrote.

In Emily’s bedroom (upper left corner of the house) is the small table at which she wrote

0

Parlor of the Evergreens. Courtesy of the Emily Dickinson Museum: the Homestead and the Evergreens. Amherst, Mass.

0

Another view of the parlor at the Evergreens. Courtesy of the Emily Dickinson Museum: the Homestead and the Evergreens. Amherst, Mass
0

Country Farmhouse in Winter
 (1857). Cornelius Krieghoff (1815-1872). Courtesy of the Emily Dickinson Museum: the Homestead and the Evergreens. Amherst, Mass
-0

A nursery door at the Evergreens. Courtesy of the Emily Dickinson Museum: the Homestead and the Evergreens. Amherst, Mass.
0

Detail of a nursery door at the Evergreens. Courtesy of the Emily Dickinson Museum: the Homestead and the Evergreens. Amherst, Mass.
0

 
View of the entrance hall of the Evergreens. Courtesy of the Emily Dickinson Museum: the Homestead and the Evergreens. Amherst, Mass
0

Entrance hall of the Evergreens. Courtesy of the Emily Dickinson Museum: the Homestead and the Evergreens. Amherst, Mass.




To know more about the Emily Dickinson Museum -- The Homestead and the Evergreens 

please click on this link. >>> Emily Dickinson Museum 


























Works -- Part 5: The Single Hound


Part Five: The Single Hound
One sister have I in our house
  1. Adventure most unto itself
  2. The Soul that has a Guest
  3. Except the smaller size, no Lives are round
  4. Fame is a fickle food
  5. The right to perish might be thought
  6. Peril as a possession
  7. When Etna basks and purrs
  8. Reverse cannot befall that fine Prosperity
  9. To be alive is power
  10. Witchcraft has not a pedigree
  11. Exhilaration is the Breeze
  12. No romance sold unto
  13. If what we could were what we would
  14. Perception of an
  15. No other can reduce
  16. The blunder is to estimate
  17. My Wheel is in the dark
  18. There is another Loneliness
  19. So gay a flower bereaved the mind
  20. Glory is that bright tragic thing
  21. The missing All prevented me
  22. His mind, of man a secret makes
  23. The suburbs of a secret
  24. The difference between despair
  25. There is a solitude of space
  26. The props assist the house
  27. The gleam of an heroic act
  28. Of Death the sharpest function
  29. Down Time’s quaint stream
  30. I bet with every Wind that blew
  31. The Future never spoke
  32. Two lengths has every day
  33. The Soul’s superior instants
  34. Nature is what we see
  35. Ah, Teneriffe!
  36. She died at play
  37. Morning’ means ‘Milking’ to the Farmer
  38. A little madness in the Spring
  39. I can’t tell you, but you feel it
  40. Some Days retired from the rest
  41. Like Men and Women shadows walk
  42. The butterfly obtains
  43. Beauty crowds me till I die
  44. We spy the Forests and the Hills
  45. I never told the buried gold
  46. The largest fire ever known
  47. Bloom upon the Mountain, stated
  48. March is the month of expectation
  49. The Duties of the Wind are few
  50. The Winds drew off
  51. I think that the root of the Wind is Water
  52. So, from the mould
  53. The long sigh of the Frog
  54. A cap of lead across the sky
  55. I send two Sunsets
  56. Of this is Day composed
  57. The Hills erect their purple heads
  58. Lightly stepped a yellow star
  59. The Moon upon her fluent route
  60. Like some old-fashioned miracle
  61. Glowing is her Bonnet
  62. Forever cherished be the tree
  63. The Ones that disappeared are back
  64. Those final Creatures,—who they are
  65. Summer begins to have the look
  66. A prompt, executive Bird is the Jay
  67. Like brooms of steel
  68. These are the days that Reindeer love
  69. Follow wise Orion
  70. In winter, in my room
  71. Not any sunny tone
  72. For Death,—or rather
  73. Dropped into the
  74. This quiet Dust was Gentlemen and Ladies
  75. T was comfort in her dying room
  76. Too cold is this
  77. I watched her face to see which way
  78. To-day or this noon
  79. I see thee better in the dark
  80. Low at my problem bending
  81. If pain for peace prepares
  82. I fit for them
  83. Not one by Heaven defrauded stay
  84. The feet of people walking home
  85. We should not mind so small a flower
  86. To the staunch Dust we safe commit thee
  87. Her ‘Last Poems
  88. Immured in Heaven! What a Cell!
  89. I ’m thinking of that other morn
  90. The overtakelessness of those
  91. The Look of Thee, what is it like?
  92. The Devil, had he fidelity
  93. Papa above!
  94. Not when we know
  95. Elijah’s wagon knew no thill
  96. Remember me,’ implored the Thief
  97. To this apartment deep
  98. Sown in dishonor?
  99. Through lane it lay, through bramble
  100. Who is it seeks my pillow nights?
  101. His Cheek is his Biographer
  102. Heavenly Father,’ take to thee
  103. The sweets of Pillage can be known
  104. The Bible is an antique volume
  105. A little over Jordan
  106. Dust is the only secret
  107. Ambition cannot find him
  108. Eden is that old-fashioned House
  109. Candor, my tepid Friend
  110. Speech is a symptom of affection
  111. Who were ‘the Father and the Son
  112. That Love is all there is
  113. The luxury to apprehend
  114. The Sea said ‘Come’ to the Brook
  115. All I may, if small
  116. Love reckons by itself alone
  117. The inundation of the Spring
  118. No Autumn’s intercepting chill
  119. Volcanoes be in Sicily
  120. Distance is not the realm of Fox
  121. The treason of an accent
  122. How destitute is he
  123. Crisis is sweet and, set of Heart
  124. To tell the beauty would decrease
  125. To love thee, year by year
  126. I showed her heights she never saw
  127. On my volcano grows the grass
  128. If I could tell how glad I was
  129. Her Grace is all she has
  130. No matter where the Saints abide
  131. To see her is a picture
  132. So set its sun in thee
  133. Had this one day not been
  134. That she forgot me was the least
  135. The incidents of Love
  136. A little overflowing word
  137. Just so, Jesus raps—He does not weary
  138. Safe Despair it is that raves
  139. The Face we choose to miss
  140. Of so divine a loss
  141. The healed Heart shows its shallow scar
  142. Give little anguish
  143. To pile like Thunder to its close
  144. The Stars are old, that stood for me
  145. All circumstances are the frame
  146. I did not reach thee

Works -- Part 4: Time and Eternity


Part Four: Time and Eternity

  1. One dignity delays for all
  2. Delayed till she had ceased to know
  3. Departed to the judgment
  4. Safe in their alabaster chambers
  5. On this long storm the rainbow rose
  6. My cocoon tightens, colors tease
  7. Exultation is the going
  8. Look back on time with kindly eyes
  9. A train went through a burial gate
  10. I died for beauty, but was scarce
  11. How many times these low feet staggered
  12. I like a look of agony
  13. That short, potential stir
  14. I went to thank her
  15. I ’ve seen a dying eye
  16. The clouds their backs together laid
  17. I never saw a moor
  18. God permits industrious angels
  19. To know just how he suffered would be dear
  20. The last night that she lived
  21. Not in this world to see his face
  22. The bustle in a house
  23. I reason, earth is short
  24. Afraid? Of whom am I afraid?
  25. The sun kept setting, setting still
  26. Two swimmers wrestled on the spar
  27. Because I could not stop for Death
  28. She went as quiet as the dew
  29. At last to be identified!
  30. Except to heaven, she is nought
  31. Death is a dialogue between
  32. It was too late for man
  33. When I was small, a woman died
  34. The daisy follows soft the sun
  35. No rack can torture me
  36. I lost a world the other day
  37. If I should n’t be alive
  38. Sleep is supposed to be
  39. I shall know why, when time is over
  40. I never lost as much but twice
  41. Let down the bars, O Death!
  42. Going to heaven!
  43. At least to pray is left, is left
  44. Step lightly on this narrow spot!
  45. Morns like these we parted
  46. A death-blow is a life-blow to some
  47. I read my sentence steadily
  48. I have not told my garden yet
  49. They dropped like flakes, they dropped like stars
  50. The only ghost I ever saw
  51. Some, too fragile for winter winds
  52. As by the dead we love to sit
  53. Death sets a thing significant
  54. I went to heaven
  55. Their height in heaven comforts not
  56. There is a shame of nobleness
  57. A triumph may be of several kinds
  58. Pompless no life can pass away
  59. I noticed people disappeared
  60. I had no cause to be awake
  61. If anybody’s friend be dead
  62. Our journey had advanced
  63. Ample make this bed
  64. On such a night, or such a night
  65. Essential oils are wrung
  66. I lived on dread; to those who know
  67. If I should die
  68. Her final summer was it
  69. One need not be a chamber to be haunted
  70. She died,—this was the way she died
  71. Wait till the majesty of Death
  72. Went up a year this evening!
  73. Taken from men this morning
  74. What inn is this
  75. It was not death, for I stood up
  76. I should not dare to leave my friend
  77. Great streets of silence led away
  78. A throe upon the features
  79. Of tribulation these are they
  80. I think just how my shape will rise
  81. After a hundred years
  82. Lay this laurel on the one
  83. This world is not conclusion
  84. We learn in the retreating
  85. They say that ‘time assuages
  86. We cover thee, sweet face
  87. That is solemn we have ended
  88. The stimulus, beyond the grave
  89. Given in marriage unto thee
  90. That such have died enables us
  91. They won’t frown always—some sweet day
  92. T is an honorable thought
  93. The distance that the dead have gone
  94. How dare the robins sing
  95. Death is like the insect
  96. T is sunrise, little maid, hast thou
  97. Each that we lose takes part of us
  98. Not any higher stands the grave
  99. As far from pity as complaint
  100. T is whiter than an Indian pipe
  101. She laid her docile crescent down
  102. Bless God, he went as soldiers
  103. Immortal is an ample word
  104. Where every bird is bold to go
  105. The grave my little cottage is
  106. This was in the white of the year
  107. Sweet hours have perished here
  108. Me! Come! My dazzled face
  109. From use she wandered now a year
  110. I wish I knew that woman’s name
  111. Bereaved of all, I went abroad
  112. I felt a funeral in my brain
  113. I meant to find her when I came
  114. I sing to use the waiting
  115. A sickness of this world it most occasions
  116. Superfluous were the sun
  117. So proud she was to die
  118. Tie the strings to my life, my Lord
  119. The dying need but little, dear
  120. There ’s something quieter than sleep
  121. The soul should always stand ajar
  122. Three weeks passed since I had seen her
  123. I breathed enough to learn the trick
  124. I wonder if the sepulchre
  125. If tolling bell I ask the cause
  126. If I may have it when it ’s dead
  127. Before the ice is in the pools
  128. I heard a fly buzz when I died
  129. Adrift! A little boat adrift!
  130. There’s been a death in the opposite house
  131. We never know we go,—when we are going
  132. It struck me every day
  133. Water is taught by thirst
  134. We thirst at first,—’t is Nature’s act
  135. A clock stopped—not the mantel’s
  136. All overgrown by cunning moss
  137. A toad can die of light!
  138. Far from love the Heavenly Father
  139. A long, long sleep, a famous sleep
  140. T was just this time last year I died
  141. On this wondrous sea